DEMENTIA FACTS: DIVE INTO DEMENTIA 101​

Dementia is a decline in cognitive function, significantly impacting memory and everyday activities. Understanding this brain condition is crucial, as it affects millions worldwide. It is a condition which affects the brain and causes among others memory loss. This leads to a decline in the ability to perform daily activities.

Many people have the misconception that dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) are the same thing. But the reality is a little bit different. Dementia is a broad term that includes many other forms of memory loss issues besides Alzheimer’s Disease, for example, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and so on.

Dementia Facts: Older blonde lady with a hopeful smile, symbolizing understanding and positivity.

Expand your knowledge through engaging educational videos on The Voise Foundation’s YouTube channel, your gateway to learning.

Facts About Dementia: 10 Essential Insights

Worldwide Impact:

Dementia facts reveal that nearly 55 million people globally grapple with this condition, underscoring its widespread prevalence.

Financial Implications:

The economic toll of dementia reaches an estimated $1 trillion each year, emphasizing its substantial financial burden.

Diverse Manifestations:

Contrary to common belief, dementia is not a singular ailment. It includes a spectrum of conditions, most notably Alzheimer’s disease, which represents 60-70% of all cases.

Not Just the Elderly:

Age is undoubtedly a key risk factor. However, dementia facts spotlight that it’s not solely an elderly concern. Early-onset variants can affect individuals as young as 30.

The Potential of the Brain:

Current studies shed light on how cognitive exercises might bolster brain plasticity, potentially postponing the emergence of dementia symptoms.

The Power of Prevention:

Factors within our control, such as diet, physical activity, heart health and mental and emotional wellness, can influence our susceptibility to dementia or even delay its onset.

Projected Surge:

By the midpoint of this century, the global count of those with dementia might triple, accentuating the urgency for research and awareness.

Standing with Caregivers:

Dementia facts underscore that in the U.S. alone, over 16 million individuals offer unpaid care to those with Alzheimer’s or other dementia types.

A Global Focus:

The World Health Organization classifies dementia as a top-tier public health challenge, pressing nations to prioritize early detection and groundbreaking research.

Optimism Through Science:

The relentless quest for knowledge and innovation in the field offers promising potential treatments on the horizon, giving hope to millions.

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WHY IS UNDERSTANDING DEMENTIA CRUCIAL?

Dementia not only affects daily activities but is also a fatal disease. The death rates vary in each of the stages of dementia. 

The Harsh Facts About Dementia: 

From 15-60% in the first six months with dementia, 45-80% at two years, and 60-85% at four years with dementia. 

HOW COMMON IS DEMENTIA?

Dementia Facts highlight that a staggering 55 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia. Projections indicate this number will rise to 78 million by 2030 and further escalate to 139 million by 2050.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF DEMENTIA ?

Dementia can present itself in a number of ways but in general, there are 10 main warning signs to look for if you suspect a loved one may have dementia.

Warning Signs of Dementia

Impaired Memory:

Frequently forgetting recent conversations, events, or appointments.

Significant Changes in Mood:

Unexpected bouts of sadness, anger, or elation without apparent cause.

Struggling with Abstract Thinking:

Challenges in understanding conceptual topics or grappling with numbers.

Struggling to Perform Daily Tasks:

Difficulty in managing routine activities like dressing or cooking.

Disorientation and Confusion:

Often feeling lost, even in familiar environments or settings.

Misplacing Things:

Regularly putting items in unusual places, like keys in the fridge.

Communication Problems:

Repeatedly searching for the right words or repeating the same stories.

Questionable Decision Making:

Making uncharacteristic choices that don’t align with past behavior.

Questionable Decision Making:

Making uncharacteristic choices that don’t align with past behavior.

Major Personality Shifts:

Drastic alterations in demeanor, from once-outgoing to now introverted or vice versa.

Social and Work Withdrawal:

Gradually retreating from hobbies, social commitments, or professional responsibilities.

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TYPES OF DEMENTIA

When thinking of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, or short AD often comes to mind.

The terms are often used interchangeably.

However, this is not correct since dementia is the generic term while Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a form of dementia.

THINGS TO DO WITH DEMENTIA PATIENTS

Meaningful activities for dementia patients are characterized by three core principles:

They must bring enjoyment and pleasure to them,

They should make them feel connected and that they are still a part of the world they live in

And another important factor is that the activity allowed them to retain a sense of personal autonomy.

IMPORTANCE OF ENJOYABLE ACTIVITIES FOR AD PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS

But why is it important especially for AD patients to find enjoyable things to do?

Finding enjoyable activities for AD patients not only result in an improved sense of efficacy as well as a reduction in feelings of burden and hopelessness.

FINDING THE RIGHT THINGS TO DO

As we have already mentioned above that it is a special challenge to find activities for Alzheimer’s patients and it has turned out to be an ongoing process, we would like to provide you withe the necessary means to cope with this task in the best possible way.

This can be done with the Pleasant Events Schedule-AD (or short PES-AD). 

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PLEASANT EVENTS SCHEDULE -AD (PES-AD)

The Pleasant Events Schedule-AD (PES-AD) is an easy-to-use inventory designed to help caregivers and providers identifying activities that are appropriate and pleasant for Alzheimer’s patients at various levels throughout the course of the disease.

It can be used by family, caregivers, paid care providers, adult day centers, nursing home staff and in general everyone who is responsible for someone with Alzheimer’s disease.